Eyeglass Prescriptions Explained

So you just had your eye exam and before you leave you are handed a little card with a bunch of numbers. At some point you may have asked yourself 'I wonder what they mean?'. Here we will examine a sample prescription and discuss how refractive errors are measured.Before we go any further we need to explain what a diopter is. In 1872 a french Ophthalmologist, Felix Monoyer, developed a new met...
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Eyeglass Lenses – Aspheric

The aspheric lens design is an important tool in helping to provide better vision to all patients.  Aspheric lenses are thinner, reduce lens weight and provide better off axis performance allowing increased visual acuity through a wider portion of the lens. An aspheric lens is simply defined as a lens varying slightly from a perfect, spherical shape.  Why is that important to an optician...
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High Index Eyeglass Lenses

As anybody who has had to wear thick lenses can tell you, it can make you a little self-conscious and you would do anything for something a little thinner. Lenses are made from a variety of materials. Many of these materials are designed to be thinner than a conventional lens. This means that they have a higher index of refraction. Index of refraction refers to the lenses ability to bend light. Th...
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Choosing Eyeglass Frame Colors

For the most attractive appearance, the color of your eyeglass frames should complement your skin tone.Skin tone is broadly classified as either warm or cool.  A warm skin tone has a bronze, golden, or "peaches and cream" cast.  A cool skin tone has blue or pink undertones.Most eyewear experts agree the following frame colors best complement each skin tone. Frame colors for warm ski...
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How To Take Care of Your Eyeglasses

Take a few minutes each day to follow these simple care tips - they'll prolong the life of your eyeglasses.  Inspect Check your eyeglasses frequently for signs of wear.  If a hinge screw is loose, visit your optician to have it tightened. Or purchase a small, precision screwdriver and do it yourself. Carefully check the alignment of your eyeglasses while standing in front of a mir...
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The History of Eyeglasses

It's been reported that Seneca - the Roman statesman, dramatist, and philosopher (4 BC-65 AD) - used a glass globe filled with water as a magnifier to read "all the books of Rome."  Around the year 1000, glass blowers in Italy are credited with producing reading stones made of solid glass.  These devices were similar to hand-held magnifying lenses of today.    In the mi...
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Your Eyeglasses Prescription

If your eye doctor determines you need corrective lenses, he or she will write an eyeglasses prescription for you at the end of your exam.  This prescription specifies the lens powers required to correct your vision.  A prescription for eyeglasses cannot be used to purchase contact lenses.  Contact lens prescriptions contain additional information that can only be determined during ...
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Choosing Eyeglass Frame Shapes

Certain frame shapes will balance and complement your facial features.  But others can result in an unattractive, awkward look.  The following guidelines will help you choose the most flattering frame shape for your facial features. General Frame Selection Guidelines Though frame styles frequently change, these general guidelines for selecting frames always apply: Eye posi...
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Eyeglass Lens Materials

Years ago, all eyeglass lenses were made of glass.  Glass lenses have excellent optical quality but they are thick and heavy.  Plastic lenses - a more comfortable, lightweight alternative - were introduced in the 1940s.  Plastic lenses offer comparable optical performance to glass lenses and are about half the weight.   Plastic remains the most popular lens material for ey...
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Contact Lenses vs. Eyeglasses

Thinking about trying contact lenses?  Whether you need corrective lenses for nearsightedness, farsightedness, astigmatism or presbyopia, contact lenses offer many advantages over eyeglasses: Wider field of view       Contact lenses give you a wider field of view than eyeglasses. Eyeglass frames block your peripheral vision.  This is especially true with toda...
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